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Massachusetts ( (listen), ), officially known as the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous state in the New England region of the Northeastern United States. It borders on the Atlantic Ocean to the east, the states of Connecticut and Rhode Island to the south, New Hampshire and Vermont to the north, and New York to the west. The capital of Massachusetts is Boston, which is also the most populous city in New England. It is home to the Greater Boston metropolitan area, a region influential upon American history, academia, and industry. Originally dependent on agriculture, fishing and trade, Massachusetts was transformed into a manufacturing center during the Industrial Revolution. During the 20th century, Massachusetts's economy shifted from manufacturing to services. Modern Massachusetts is a global leader in biotechnology, engineering, higher education, finance, and maritime trade.

Plymouth was the site of the second colony in New England after Popham Colony in 1607 in what is now Maine. Plymouth was founded in 1620 by the Pilgrims, passengers of the Mayflower. In 1692, the town of Salem and surrounding areas experienced one of America's most infamous cases of mass hysteria, the Salem witch trials. In 1777, General Henry Knox founded the Springfield Armory, which during the Industrial Revolution catalyzed numerous important technological advances, including interchangeable parts. In 1786, Shays' Rebellion, a populist revolt led by disaffected American Revolutionary War veterans, influenced the United States Constitutional Convention. In the 18th century, the Protestant First Great Awakening, which swept Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, originated from the pulpit of Northampton preacher Jonathan Edwards. In the late 18th century, Boston became known as the "Cradle of Liberty" for the agitation there that later led to the American Revolution.

The entire Commonwealth of Massachusetts has played a powerful scientific, commercial, and cultural role in the history of the United States. Before the American Civil War, Massachusetts was a center for the abolitionist, temperance, and transcendentalist movements. In the late 19th century, the sports of basketball and volleyball were invented in the western Massachusetts cities of Springfield and Holyoke, respectively. In 2004, Massachusetts became the first U.S. state to legally recognize same-sex marriage as a result of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court's decision in Goodridge v. Department of Public Health. Many prominent American political dynasties have hailed from the state, including the Adams and Kennedy families. Harvard University in Cambridge is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States, with the largest financial endowment of any university, and Harvard Law School has educated a contemporaneous majority of Justices of the Supreme Court of the United States. Kendall Square in Cambridge has been called "the most innovative square mile on the planet", in reference to the high concentration of entrepreneurial start-ups and quality of innovation which have emerged in the vicinity of the square since 2010. Both Harvard and MIT, also in Cambridge, have been ranked among the most highly regarded academic institutions in the world. Massachusetts' public-school students place among the top tier in the world in academic performance. The state has been ranked as one of the top states in the United States for citizens to live in, as well as one of the most expensive.

Massachusetts Media

25,963 media by topicpage 1 of 260
Joseph Hawley correspondence and documents
Hutchinson, 18th governor of Massachusetts.
William Bollan statement of account with the Province of Massachusetts Bay
1772-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Barnstable, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Acton, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Andover, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Abington, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Attleborough, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Ashby, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773 December 20, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773 March 9, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Amherst, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Ashburnham, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Bedford, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Berkshire, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Athol, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1774 July 29, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Thomas Pownall Esqr., member of Parliament, late Governor Captain General and Commander in Chief, and Vice Admiral of his Majesty's Provinces Massachusetts Bay and South Carolina, and Lieut. Governor of New Jersey.
1777 April 17, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Sumner, Increase et al. Boston, Massachusetts
Legal communications with Massachusetts state government, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1777, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1777-1783, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1778 April 8, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Various plans and draughts of cities, towns, harbours &c.
Town of Northampton response to the Massachusetts Constitutional Convention
1783 May 29, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1783 May 21, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1783 May 14, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
The g'hals of Boston; or, Pen and pencil sketches of celebrated courtezans. By one of 'em
Lottie Grimke
DAILY MENU [held by] AMERICAN HOUSE[at] "BOSTON, MA" ([HOTEL])
DAILY MENU [held by] REVERE HOUSE [at] "BOSTON, MA" ([HOTEL?])
DAILY MENU [held by] AMERICAN HOUSE [at] "BOSTON, MA" (HOTEL)
DAILY MENU [held by] PARKER HOUSE [at] "BOSTON, MA" (HOTEL)
Gov. Andrew [Massachusetts Governor]
DAILY MENU [held by] REVERE HOUSE [at] "BOSTON, MA" (HOTEL)
Occupation of Baltimore by General Butler. Union troops passing down Lee Street, May 12, 1861. Portion of Boston artillery flanked by Infantry of the 6th Mass. regiment to Federal Hill
DAILY DINNER MENU [held by] REVERE HOUSE [at] "BOSTON, MA" (HOTEL)
"Wizard" of Boston, Wm. Willcomb, Commander page 73
Capt. William Willcomb page 66
The Putnam cupboard of English oak and cedar. Presented to the Essex Institute, Salem, by Miss Harriet Putnam Fowler. Carved settle of American Oak. Found in a stable at Barrington, Massachusetts. Now in Bulkeley collection.
W. N. DeBerry; [Pastor of a Congregational Church in Springfield, Massachusetts.]
FHA (Federal Housing Administration) low income housing project. Holyoke, Massachusetts
Holyoke is a city of canals which supply water to the paper mills that line their banks. Massachusetts
Picnic park created by CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps). Savoy Mountain State Park, Massachusetts
Last residence of James Otis, Andover, Massachusetts.
1772-1775, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Chatham, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Littleton, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1772-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Charlestown, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Dedham, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Ipswich, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Cape Elizabeth, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Gardnerston, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Kittery, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Lancaster, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Gorham, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Berwick, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Kingston, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Lunenburg, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Harvard, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Holden, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Dorchester, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Fitchburgh, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773 September 1, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Georgetown, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Hatfield, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Groton, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Harpswell, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Brimfield, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Gloucester, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Braintree, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Concord, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Lenox, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Holliston, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Bradford, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Lincoln, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Bolton, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
Duxborough, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773-1774, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773 February 11, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
1773, Boston Committee of Correspondence Records
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