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Roman Wonders

Prints of Rome's views, buildings and ruinsCreated by: New York Public Library'sDated: 1650
Another view of the remains of the Pronaos of the Temple of Concord [The Temple of Saturn with Arch of Septimius Severus in left background], from Vedute di Roma (Views of Rome), part I
Renaissance representation of classical ruins was a symbol of antiquity, enlightenment, and lost knowledge. Ruins spoke to the passage of time. The greatest subject for ruin artists was the overgrown and crumbling Classical Rome remains. Forum and the Colosseum, Pantheon, and the Appian Way.

Initially, art representations of Rome were realistic, but soon the imagination of artists took flight. Roman ruins were scattered around the city, but frustrated artists began placing them in more pleasing arrangements. Capriccio was a style of imaginary scenes of buildings and ruins.
1583
1583
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1929
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1929
337 Media in collectionpage 1 of 4
Panteon
Gelage
Biclinio
Roman beds

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