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The crow and the raven [cont.]; The rook and the dog.

The donkey who envied the horse's life [cont.]; The miser.

Hermes and the traveler [cont.]; The thieving child and his mother.

The travelers and the axe [cont.]; The frogs.

The coal man and the fuller [cont.]; The fishermen who caught stones.

The weasel and the rooster.

The fisherman who played the flute [cont.]; The cowherd and the lion.

The donkey and the gardener [cont.]; The bird catcher and the crested lark.

The thieving child and his mother [cont.].

The braggart [cont.]; The man who promised the impossible.

The roosters and the partridge [cont.]; The fox and the mask.

The snake and the crab [cont.]; The shepherd and the wolf.

The kingfisher [cont.].

Hermes and Tiresias [end]; The two dogs.

The lion, the wolf, and the fox [cont.].

The sleeping dog and the wolf [cont.]; The dog, the rooster, and the fox.

The reed and the olive tree [cont.]; The wolf and the heron.

The goat and the wolf [cont.]; The mule.

The dog who came to dinner [end]; The fisherman who played the flute.

The hares and the frogs [end]; The donkey who envied the horse's life.

The frogs and the dried-up pond [cont.]; The old man and death.

The miser [cont.]; The greese and the cranes.

The shepherd and the sea [cont.]; The pomegranate, the apple, and the olive trees, and the thornbush.

The donkey, the crow, and the wolf [cont.]; The donkey, the fox, and the lion.

The frogs [cont.]; The beekeeper.

The hares and the frogs [cont.].

The peacock and the jackdaw [cont.]; The wild boar and the fox.

The monkey and the dolphin [cont.]; The flies.

The sick crow [cont.]; The eagle.

The man and the shrew [cont.]; The kid and the flute playing wolf.

The bird catcher and the crested lark [cont.]; Hermes and the traveler.

The sow and the dog; The snake and the crab.

The crab and the fox [cont.]; The zither player.

The fox and the mask [cont.]; The coal man and the fuller.

The hares and the foxes [cont.]; The ant.

The farmer and his dogs [cont.]; The woman and the hen.

The two boys and the butcher [cont.]; The fox and the monkey king.

The fox and the woodcutter [cont.].

The rook and the dog [cont.]; The crow and the snake.

The fisherman and the minnow [cont.]; The horse and the donkey.

The horse and the donkey [cont.]; The man and the Satyr.

The ant [cont.]; The bat and the weasels.

The bat, the thorn, and the gull [cont.].

The two dogs [cont.]; The man and the shrew.

The old man and death [cont.]; The old woman and the doctor.

The fishermen and the tuna [cont.]; The broken vow.

The cricket and the ants [cont.]; The fox and the worm; The hen who laid the goldern eggs.

Zeus and modesty [cont.]; Zeus and the tortoise.

The cowherd and the lion [cont.]; The sick crow.

The fox, and the donkey disguised as a lion [cont.]; The donkey and the frogs.

The weasel and the rooster [cont.]; The fox with the cropped tail.

The woman and the servants [cont.]; The magician.

The rich man and the mourners [cont.]; The shepherd and his sheep.

The eagle and the fox [cont.].

The trumpeter; The reed and the olive tree.

The jackdaw at large [cont.]; Hermes and the craftsmen.

The cheat [cont.]; The fishermen and the tuna.

The nightingale and the sparrow hawk.

The dog, the rooster, and the fox [cont.].

The castor [cont.]; The dog and the butcher.

The bat, the thorn, and the gull [end]; The donkey and the gardener.

The snails [cont.]; The woman and the servants.

The old woman and the doctor [cont.].

The fawn and the deer [cont.]; The hares and the frogs.

The kingfisher [end]; The fisherman.

The hen and the swallow [cont.]; The first appearance of the camel.

The doctor and his patient [cont.]; The bird catcher and the viper.

The fox and the bramble [cont.]; The fox and the crocodile.

The tortoise and the eagle [cont.]; The flea and the man.

The donkey in the lion's skin [cont.]; The sparrow.

The bat and the weasels [cont.]; The travelers and the flotsam.

The jackdaw and the pigeons [cont.]; The jackdaw at large.

Hermes and the sculptor [cont.]; Hermes and Tiresias.

The shepherd and the wolf [cont.]; The lion, the wolf, and the fox.

The woman and the drunkard [end]; The boar and the mouse; The donkey in the lion's skin.

The old woman and the doctor [end]; The farmer and his children.

The wild boar and the fox [cont.]; The crested lark; The fawn and the deer.

The stepped on serpent [cont.]; The thirsty dove.

The fox and the goat [end]; The fox who had never seen a lion.

The dove and the crow [cont.]; The rich man and the mourners.

The bird catcher and the viper [cont.]; The castor.

The farmer and the goddess fortune [cont.]; The travelers and the axe.

The thieving child and his mother [end]; The shepherd and the sea.

The crow and the snake [cont.]; The jackdaw and the pigeons.

The lion, the bear, and the fox [cont.]; The fortune-teller.

Hermes and Tiresias [cont.].

The fox and the woodcutter [end]; The man who broke the statue.

Hermes and the craftsmen [cont.]; Zeus and modesty.

The doe and the vines [cont.]; The donkey, the rooster, and the lion.

The swallow and the crow; The nightingale and the bat.

The dog, the rooster, and the fox [end]; The lion and the frog; The lion, the donkey, and the fox.

The greese and the cranes [cont.]; The tortoise and the eagle.

The wolf and the old woman [cont.]; The goat and the wolf.

The travelers and the flotsam [cont.]; The wild donkey and the tame one.

The broken vow [end]; The frogs and the dried-up pond.

The man who promised the impossible [cont.]; The cheat.

The lion, the donkey, and the fox [cont.]; The lion, the bear, and the fox.

The mole and his mother [cont.]; The wasps, the partridges, and the farmer.

The magician [cont.]; The weasel and the file; The farmer and the goddess fortune.

The fishermen who caught stones [cont.]; The braggart.

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